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Dear Workforce Is It Okay To Hire Employees Away From Our Customers

We often receive resumes from individuals employed by our customers. We value our customer relationships very highly. On the other hand, a number of our job openings are very difficult to fill because of the skill sets they require. How should we handle this dilemma?
August 7, 2003
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Related Topics: Candidate Sourcing, Dear Workforce
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Dear Tempted:
Evidently, the individuals seeking employment in your company regard your organization as a highly desirable place to work--a worthy tribute, and no small feat in today's environment. Congratulations.
Deciding whether to hire someone from a client organization is something each organization needs to decide based on its values and client relationships. As long as the employment application is unsolicited, many organizations will place a client employee into the selection process. If you decide to proceed, then you need to do two things:
1) Maintain the integrity and fairness of your selection process by giving consistent consideration of and treatment to all candidates.
2) Continue to be--and be seen as--an employer of choice. Having a selection system that is accurate, equitable, and respectful to candidates will reinforce your image as an employer of choice, and decrease the number of unqualified applicants in the system.
I sense your concern about screening a large number of unqualified candidates for difficult-to-fill positions. There some steps you can take to remedy this situation. First, create well-defined success profiles for each position. The success profile focuses your decisions about who is qualified to move to the next stage of your selection process, and ultimately whom to hire. The profile comprises the experience, knowledge, motivations, and skills necessary for success in the job. You should gear your entire hiring process toward collecting and evaluating candidates' data against the profile.
Many of the applicants may be unaware of the success profile. You can easily address this in your sourcing (e.g. job posting site) and qualifying process. Try revisiting your realistic job preview and other qualifying tools to determine if they provide sufficient information to candidates, thus enabling them to decide if there is a match between their skills and what you are looking for. This will help people take themselves out of the hiring process and will minimize the number of unqualified candidates.
SOURCE: Debra Gaskin Gibson, senior consultant and program manager,Development Dimensions International, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Nov. 27, 2002.
LEARN MORE: ReadSafe Hiring Audit for more information.
The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.
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 The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.

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