RSS icon

Top Stories

DEAR WORKFORCE

Dear Workforce How Do We Ease New Employees Into the Mix Following an Acquisition

As a result of a recent acquisition, our company will be relocating about 100 employees from Pennsylvania to Florida by November 2005. Some of the associates have 15 to 20 years’ tenure. They are vested in the company and don’t want to lose all they’ve worked for. At the same time, they’re not all excited about moving. What suggestions are there to integrate the newer team members into our culture in a way that will make the transition a little smoother for them?
May 19, 2006
Recommend (0) Comments (0) ASK A QUESTION
Related Topics: Mergers and Acquisitions, Dear Workforce
Reprints
Dear Breeding Contentment:

Transferring across the country to a new geographic area, into what is essentially a new company, can be intimidating. Help your transferring employees get to know the area, find housing and learn local customs. A good real estate agent can help with some of this, but assigning your local employees to assist incoming families will help build relationships and provide valuable insights into neighborhoods, schools, local attractions and social conventions. Such mentors can be extremely helpful in orienting transferring employees to the business by coaching them on issues, organizational culture, values, key players, expectations and opportunities.
Disperse transfers among departments to prevent a "they" and "we" mentality. Leaving the transferred group together at the new site can make it difficult for them to feel like they are a part of the organization. Indoctrinate the employees with the organization's mission, values, strategies and goals to provide them a useful framework from which to begin operating, and help give them an identity as a member of the group. Anything you can do to ease the transition into new pay scales and benefit programs, without alienating local employees, also will help.
Provide opportunities for transfers to work closely with local employees. Assign them work with others on challenging projects that can have a substantial impact on the business. As the group works together, transferred employees will have opportunities to develop friendships with local employees, build respect, establish credibility and assimilate into the organization.
Ideally, the projects will require collaboration to devise solutions, such as developing a new product, creating new business processes that are more cost-effective or solving a long-standing production or design problem. Choose projects requiring a fair amount of creativity to help prevent conversations about "the company way" or "how we used to do it" and encourage an integrated approach. Anyrecognition or reward associated with team accomplishments will need to be assigned to the team as a whole and not to individuals.
The first year is the most critical time for melding the groups. During the year, check in on the transferred employees to make sure they have what they need in the community as well as the office. Ascertain through their speech and behaviors how well they are connecting to the organization. If you plan and execute well, your transferring employees should assimilate into the organization quickly and productively.
SOURCE: Kevin Herring, Ascent Management Consulting, Oro Valley, Arizona, April 27, 2005.
LEARN MORE: How to keep good employees from leaving during a relocation
The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.
Ask a Question
Dear Workforce Newsletter
ASK A QUESTION

 The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.

If you have any questions or concerns about Workforce.com, please email customerservice@workforce.com or call 312-676-9900.

The Workforce fax number is 312-676-9901.

Sign up for Dear Workforce e-newsletters!

Comments