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Dear Workforce How Do We Reward Individual Performance at Our Government Agency

One of the divisions within our agency wants to start rewarding and acknowledging employees for their efforts that exceed the norm. Due to the limitation of raises in government, the division wants to start a recognition program of some sort to accomplish this. The question is, will having such a program create a problem if one division does this and the other divisions within the agency do not?
December 2, 2005
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Dear Unsure:

All the divisions within your government agency ought to emphasize rewards and recognition, particularly in light of the talent shortage experienced by many organizations. The recognition program of each division, unit, manager and employee, however, ought to be unique. Following are some things to keep in mind when implementing a successful recognition and reward program.
Why. Recognition is an easy and effective way to increase retention and productivity. Not only will employees feel valued, but they will know when they've made a positive contribution and will contribute more of the same going forward.
Who. Recognition need not come solely from senior leadership or one's direct supervisor. Co-workers are great motivators because they work together and are more apt to point out the desired behavior in one of their colleagues. Create a climate in which employees encourage one another you will find that they contribute even more.
When and Where. Recognition should not be an annual or even semiannual event. Instead, it should occur continuously. If you observe someone doing a great job, recognizing him of her accordingly could increase the likelihood that the same employee will repeat that behavior.
What. Money seldom is the primary motivator for employees. Instituting a casual-clothes day or allowing for a more flexible schedule are rewards that wouldn't cost an organization a dime, yet could be great motivators for employees.
How. Recognition should be suited to individual employees. Every manager should have a conversation with their employees to determine what motivates them and how they like to be recognized for their great work.
SOURCE: Kathryn Meyer,Capital H Group, Milwaukee, Feb. 11, 2005.
LEARN MORE:How to Prove that Rewards Have Value. Also: rewarding people whowork long hoursor generate new business. Gifts thatfall flat on their faces and programs for retirees thathave been slashed. One CEO's perspective on recognition.Bob Nelson's view on formal recognition.
The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.
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 The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.

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