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Dear Workforce How Do We Overcome Obstacles When Forming an Advisory Board

We’re looking to form a board of advisers, to be separate from our board of directors. We’re looking primarily for educators, researchers and tech experts in the human resources field—something our board of directors doesn’t understand. How do we A) start such a process; B) approach and entice professors; and C) keep them interested in participating?
December 10, 2004
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Related Topics: The HR Profession, HR Services and Administration, Dear Workforce
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Dear Looking Hard:

This is a great opportunity for you. Start by creating a "who's who in human resources" list. Include people who have published recent articles that pertain to your search. List the top universities you wish to see represented in the "educators" category. Contact CIOs and ask them to refer top technology experts. Many large universities run Enterprise Clinic alliances, which are great sources for all-around talented people who are eager to serve on advisory boards. It's important that your list include the "best of the best," i.e., people who will complement your board of directors and your company's mission.
Does your board of directors understand your desire to have an advisory board, or do they not understand human resources? Perhaps you and your CEO could meet with the candidates just as you would with applicants for a senior executive position. Include your board of directors in the selection process. I bet they'd help make sure the effort is successful.
In my experience, advisers may provide an uncompensated service. Many of them are more interested in giving than receiving. However, some organizations provide a small stipend or even stock options to members of their advisory board.
SOURCE: Linda Hovey, president, AlphaDirections Inc., Portsmouth, New Hampshire, January 23, 2004.
LEARN MORE:Board Directorships: A Higher Calling.
The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.
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Dear Workforce Newsletter
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 The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.

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