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Dear Workforce How Do We Plug Skills Gaps of Our Recruiters?

Recruiters at our company have a tough time closing deals. They gather specifications, source qualified candidates, screen and interview candidates and compile 'short lists'--and then they wait to hear back. Trouble is, I think our recruiters either a) have poor communication skills or b) aren't doing their jobs efficiently. How do I identify and plug the gap? What training modules might exist for enhancing their skills?
September 9, 2005
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Related Topics: Employee Communication, Global Recruiting, Compensation Design and Communication, Employee Screening, Candidate Sourcing, Interviewing, Strategic Planning, Dear Workforce, Compensation, Legal
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Dear Not Seeing Results:
 
Recruiters must win the trust of both their customers and job candidates to be effective. Pay attention to clues that indicate if that trust is lacking. Watch for clues that the hiring manager views the recruiter as an administrative person who is simply needed to post job want-ads and quickly screen resumes. That can cause a lot of problems.
Also, make sure recruiters are being allowed to set up interviews with candidates. If they can't, this is a clue that people view your recruiters as poor at assessing people's skills. The problem also could exist because hiring managers take theinterviewing and selection process too lightly. Sometimes this is due to a lack of emphasis on the need to hire top people, or because managers don't recognize the important role they play in hiring top people.
Recruiters must become partners to gain trust with hiring managers. Recruiters must know the real job, find top candidates and accurately assess their competency levels. Developing a service-level agreement whereby the recruiter agrees to some performance objectives in exchange for the hiring manager's time is one way to form a partnership. The recruiter needs at least 30 to 45 minutes up front to better understand the job needs.
A formal process should accompany a list of potential candidates, with a clear statement explaining why each person is suitable for the job. Formalizing the process forces the hiring manager to treat recruiting more seriously and devote more time to it. In creating this process, recruiters must become better at delivering stronger candidates. Collectively, this is how the two sides become partners. When a hiring manager sees a recruiting partner as an expert in the hiring process, they tend to react more quickly and are less likely to dismiss candidates out of hand.
SOURCE: Lou Adler, the Adler Group Inc., Irvine, California
LEARN MORE: Hiring Manager Quality Survey. Also:Guerrilla Tactics that Recruiters Can Use on Managers.
The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.
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Dear Workforce Newsletter
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 The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.

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