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History is Full of Examples of Speech Followed by Actions of Oppression, Warfare and Crime.

"Speech is an action," says Joseph Clayberg, Director of On-Line Education & Development, The Center for Applied Technology, Inc., Tulsa, OK.

February 11, 2000
Many of the points you made do make sense, but I believe the basic issue is; you may say what you wish, (free speech) but you also may incur consequences for what you say. Simple as that sounds, that would be the lesson I would give my children. There is a level of responsibility required to our actions. Speech is an action.

Our society has many freedoms such as free speech but it should be attached to being responsible for the views expressed. We have a bad habit of placing levels of acceptance on speech that could actually be repugnant to those whose freedom is so fleeting. Minorities have had a terrible road to freedom in this country therefore it is truly a more sensitive issue and may actually cause more anxiety. Paying the price for saying bad things, particularly if they are expressed by an adult, should be as important as keeping speech free.

History is full of examples of speech followed by actions of oppression, warfare and crime by the "innocent" speechmaker.

We all know why the man said what he did, I realize that he can say what he wants, I just do not want to hear him whine when we do not accept his apology.