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More Employees Unhappy With Work-Life Balance: Survey

While telecommuting can allow an employee to balance life and work, it may also limit their upward mobility within a company, according to a recent survey by Korn/Ferry International.

April 22, 2013

While Yahoo Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer's decision to end telecommuting for her employees is old news, the debate around working from home continues.

Most executives find telecommuting boosts productivity and allows working parents to continue their careers, according to a recent survey published April 12 by Korn/Ferry International, a global provider of talent management solutions.

Nearly 80 percent of survey respondents indicated that their companies allow employees to telecommute, while some 58 percent say they telecommute themselves. And an overwhelming 94 percent believe working from home is an important option for parents who work, the survey says.

A 2012 survey also conducted by Korn/Ferry shows that 80 percent of female executives believe being able to connect with the workplace whenever and wherever they are has allowed them to better balance life and work.

Even though almost all responses to both surveys believe telecommuting has a positive effect on employee work/life balance, 60 percent also believe working from home can limit career upward mobility, according to the April 12 survey.

"While working at home can be beneficial for both companies and workers, it can also lead to 'invisibility' that can limit opportunities for career advancement," said Ana Dutra, Korn/Ferry's CEO of Leadership and Talent Consulting, in a written statement. "It is important for telecommuters to remain networked as closely as possible with peers and leaders in the office."

Max Mihelich is Workforce's associate editor. Follow Mihelich on Twitter at @workforcemax. Comment below or email editors@workforce.com.