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Child-Care Models

April 1, 2004
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Forty-two percent of companies help employees find care.
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A Case For Child Care

April 1, 2004
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While many employers steer clear of providing child care and are leery of the cost, complications and regulation, others are examining the matter in a new light. Abbott Laboratories, IBM and Procter & Gamble have developed cost-effective models for analyzing and meeting employees' child-care needs. The motivation is not humanitarian or altruistic. Some companies now regard child care as something they must do to be competitive.
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Adoption Programs Gaining Ground

March 29, 2004
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The Calvert Group is one employer that kicks in money and time for employees who adopt children. But the take-up rate is low, so it costs companies little to increase employee morale and goodwill by offering this benefit.
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Streamline Benefits on Eight Tracks

September 18, 2003
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By earning benchmarks, doing cost-benefit analyses, and measuring employee lost-time, you can show ROI.
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The Effectiveness of Work-Life Programs

September 18, 2003
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Some programs, like an alternative work week and a compressed workweek, are more effective than others at reducing absences.
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Camping World's Job Descriptions

September 18, 2003
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Short ads for a Senior Marketing Analyst; a Call Center and Sales Support Manager; a Second Shift Warehouse Supervisor; and an Assistant Managing Agent.
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Sickened By the Cost of Absenteeism

September 2, 2003
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Internally devised tracking systems, off-the-shelf software and outsourced absence reporting services are all growing popularity as employers try to figure out where an estimated 15 percent of their payroll is going.
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Job Absence Rates

August 5, 2003
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A chart that shows days of absence as a percent of scheduled workdays.
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The Case Against Sick Days

March 27, 2003
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You've probably seen a coworker with mounds of used tissues on his desk, sweating profusely and responding "I'm fine" when people inquire about his health. In this opinion column, psychologist Kenneth Siegel says the coming-to-work-sick phenomenon has gone too far, and that sick days should be abolished altogether.
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