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Dear Workforce How Do We Improve Our Recruitment of Topnotch Nurses?

I am looking for inexpensive ways to find new talent. We do not have accounts with major job boards, and in the past have spent enormous sums on print advertising and the use of agencies, with minimal success. My main focus is finding registered nurses who are looking to take their careers in another direction, out of patient care. I have gone to nursing schools and posted jobs, but have had no luck. That is probably because we are looking for experienced nurses. I need some creative recruiting ideas to present to our management. Although we are in a hiring freeze, I want to be ready to hit the ground running once we begin hiring again.
January 19, 2010
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Related Topics: Recognition, Candidate Sourcing, Strategic Planning, Dear Workforce
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Dear Getting Ready for the Rebound:
As you have discovered through trial and error, many people no longer turn to the newspaper to find a job.
There are some high-tech "want ad" replacements, but in today's market, leveraging the relationships of nurses already on board is probably the best way to find new talent.
First, let's talk briefly about online job posting. You mention you have avoided large job boards because they are expensive, but there are several popular online venues where job posting is free. These include LinkedIn, Craigslist and some alumni sites. You might want to experiment with these and see if a posting attracts quality candidates.
Another electronic recruiting option is your own Web site. Job seekers today are doing targeted job hunts. It is not unusual for candidates to research many companies and then focus all their efforts on a chosen few. If you improve your Web site to clearly show why you are a great employer and let job seekers know that you are hiring, this can yield good talent.
The most effective recruiting doesn't involve technology at all. Experienced hiring professionals believe that networking remains the most effective approach. That means you should ask all the nurses who work with you to recommend their friends, former colleagues and mentors.
One successful way to engage your existing staff is to build a referral incentive program. Many companies offer a small cash bonus to any employee who recommends an individual who gets hired. You could also hold an open house or host a series of presentations on topics of interest to nurses and ask your current team to bring their friends and former co-workers.
Last, it makes sense to ask the nurses you employ already where they would look if they were going to find a candidate (or search for a job). This will help you spot recruiting methods and sources you have not identified.
SOURCE: Ellen Raim, vice president of human resources, Cascade Microtech, Beaverton, Oregon
LEARN MORE:Solutions and strategies for recruiting minority nurses
The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.
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Dear Workforce Newsletter
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 The information contained in this article is intended to provide useful information on the topic covered, but should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion. Also remember that state laws may differ from the federal law.

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