Workforce.com

JobCentral Gets Simply Bigger in Listings Pact

It isn't clear whether the board's plan to give job seekers access to more listings will be a big help to corporate recruiters.

February 3, 2006
Online job board JobCentral is trying to become more central to both employers and job seekers. But it’s not clear whether moves announced in mid-January--which include increasing the number of job postings accessible through the site from 340,000 to nearly 4.5 million --will be a big help to corporate recruiters or threaten the biggest job boards.

It’s more important for employers to get their job listings in front of the right niche audience and get help with services such as candidate screening than it is to gather a mountain of résumés, says Kevin Wheeler, president of consulting firm Global Learning Resources, which focuses on recruiting and employee development. "It’s not a volume game anymore," he says. "Success is going to come from targeted marketing."

The site, officially called JobCentral National Employment Network, is a service of the DirectEmployers Association, a nonprofit group made up of major U.S. companies. The association’s executive director, Bill Warren, was the first president of Monster.com.

The association said this month that it teamed up with job search engine Simply Hired to let users of JobCentral access more than 4 million job listings indexed by SimplyHired.com. Clicking on the "Search the Web" tab on the search results page at JobCentral provides additional listings from the SimplyHired.com database.

The association also introduced the National Labor Exchange, a résumé database at JobCentral that is free to Direct­Employers members. Nonmember em- ployers are charged an annual $25 registration fee. The association also planned to announce that member company jobs from JobCentral will appear on the Google Base site and on the sites of job search engines Indeed and Simply Hired.

Steven Style, a spokesman for JobCentral, says the site should become more appealing to job seekers and, therefore, companies. "If you have the jobs searchers, you have the employers wanting to list," he says.

Mark Mehler, a founder of consulting firm CareerXroads, suggests JobCentral could disrupt the online recruiting arena partly through its low cost. A job listing at JobCentral costs $25. A single posting at Monster.com costs $395, though volume discounts can bring the price down to $145. "Major companies are spending six figures every year on the major job boards," Mehler says. But he warns it remains to be seen whether JobCentral will become a hub for job seekers.

JobCentral has yet to scare Monster. Danielle Perry, spokeswoman for Monster, says the deal with Simply Hired makes JobCentral another job posting aggregator. Aggregators can frustrate users, in part by delivering dead links, she says. Monster, meanwhile, aims to give employers a range of services, such as help complying with a new rule for federal contractors.

"We are not about job listings," Perry says. "We are about helping employers find quality candidates."

Ed Frauenheim